A Little Focus Makes a Difference

A Little Focus Makes a Difference

Corey Ford, managing partner of Matter, said some of the teams went in new directions by concentrating on the education space.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Finding and Buying Art in Plain Sight

Finding and Buying Art in Plain Sight

Musey's CEO Jude Fulton said her mobile app helps people discover and purchase designer products they see in the real world.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Bringing Footage From the Field to Primetime

Bringing Footage From the Field to Primetime

Lindsey Stewart, CEO of Stringr, said her platform can help news outlets find and license video shot by professionals and laypersons anywhere.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Cutting Down the Cacophony in Education

Cutting Down the Cacophony in Education

CEO Ben Werdmuller said Known lets students bring together material from other educational software into one place, giving them more control over coursework.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

A Lesson in Simplicity

A Lesson in Simplicity

Co-founder Erin Jo Richey said Known creates a place for students to compile their research notes, projects, and assignments that can be shared with classmates.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Getting the Masses to Listen

Getting the Masses to Listen

Colin Mutchler, CEO, said Louder's crowd promotion platform helps people call more attention to news, events, and social movements.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Curated Content for the Classroom

Curated Content for the Classroom

Leyla Akincilar, education consultant with EduCrate, tapped into her experience as an assistant principal and English teacher to help the startup meet educators' needs.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Finding a New Tune

Finding a New Tune

Before homing in on edtech with EduCrate, CEO Joe Brilliant entered the Matter program with a plan for shareable, curated audio and video lists.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Seeing Cities Through a Data Lens

Seeing Cities Through a Data Lens

Alicia Rouault, CEO of LocalData, said her data-driven mapping platform can help urban planners and real estate developers make informed choices about the future of their cities.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Creating change in the media world sometimes means connecting with other sectors.

From the start, the Matter accelerator in San Francisco has been about nurturing media startups. Some of the companies in the program’s third class, though, are putting their ideas to work in the education market. Matter held a demo day in New York this week for its latest six graduates.

The teams behind Known and EduCrate (born out of CratePlayer) both entered the program with different plans in mind before finding focus in the classroom. “Known started out very broad, with a publishing platform for everybody, and their technology still has the potential for that,” said Corey Ford, managing partner of Matter.

That idea got tightened up, he said, to create a system for integrating course software from other sources, allowing students to publish their class materials in one place.

Meanwhile EduCrate evolved from creating shareable media playlists to a way for teachers to curate media, and gather educational videos from various sources.

It makes some sense for Matter to bring its startups to New York, media hub that it is. Back in February, the accelerator brought its second class of graduates to town.

Ford said the program looks for entrepreneurs who use digital technology with media to help society be more informed and better connected.

Matter features a smaller class of startups than some other accelerators, but it manages to attract inclusive, diverse teams. In this class, five of six startups had female entrepreneurs on stage for the demos. “We didn’t have to think about it,” Ford said. “It just happened that way.”