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Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

The Form Cell system is comprised of a line of Form 2 printers (in this case five of them). The printers can run simultaneously, producing different custom objects.

Photo by Jeff Engel

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

The designs for Xconomy's awards were created using Autodesk's Dynamo Studio software.

Image courtesy of Zach Kron

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

About a dozen variations were created before arriving at the final designs for the 11 award categories.

Image courtesy of Zach Kron

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

The Form Cell's printers and robotic system are encased behind transparent panels that block ultraviolet light.

Photo courtesy of Formlabs

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

One of the designs involved an "X" comprised of dozens of tiny "X's."

Photo by Zach Kron

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

Here's one of the prototypes, looking quite regal in the light. Xconomy's awards are made of clear resin.

Photo by Zach Kron

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

Another prototype. (No, Zacks will not be receiving one of the Xconomy Awards---although she deserves one for all the work she has put in designing them.)

Photo by Zach Kron

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

Formlabs chief product officer Dávid Lakatos explains how the Form Cell system works.

Photo by Zach Kron

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

Form Cell's automated 3D printing system is controlled by software. The printing process starts by uploading a file containing the design instructions.

Photo by Zach Kron

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

A robotic arm handles most of the labor, including removing parts from the printers so the next job can start.

Photo by Jeff Engel

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

The Form 2 prints parts using a stereolithography process, which involves using a laser to cure resin in layers.

Photo by Jeff Engel

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

The Form 2 includes a wiper and heater system to make the builds more reliable, and resin containers to make the process less messy.

Photo by Jeff Engel

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

Each Xconomy trophy takes about 16 hours to print. That's longer than usual, Formlabs says. That's partly because of the trophies' height (about 5.5 inches) and the fact that they're made of solid resin, not hollow.

Photo by Jeff Engel

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

After the part is finished, the robotic arm removes it from the printer and places it in a post-processing station (the blue container on the right). That machine cleans the part and cures it some more.

Photo by Jeff Engel

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

After the part is cleaned, the robotic arm places it on a tray for a human worker to finish preparing it.

Photo by Jeff Engel

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy's awards, like many parts made with 3D printers, need to be removed from support structures (the scaffolding material visible on the right side of the part).

Photo by Zach Kron

Xconomy Awards

Xconomy Awards

We'll leave you with a parting shot of the back of one of the awards---you'll have to join us September 26 to find out whose names are on the front!

Photo by Zach Kron

Xconomy Boston — 

For Xconomy’s first-ever industry awards gala, we wanted to make trophies that stand out and represent the winning Boston life sciences innovators in a fun and creative way.

These days, it doesn’t get much cooler than making stuff with 3D printers. We partnered with Formlabs, a 3D printing company located in nearby Somerville, MA, to manufacture custom trophies that will be presented to the winners at the event on the night of September 26. (You can still snag your ticket here.)

Check out photos of the trophies and the 3D printing process in the above slideshow. The awards were designed by Rebecca Zacks, Xconomy’s co-founder and chief operating officer, and her husband, Zach Kron, a senior product manager at Autodesk. Autodesk’s Dynamo Studio software was used to create the design instructions for Formlabs’ printers.

Formlabs is printing the trophies with its new Form Cell system, which aims to automate much of the printing process using a combination of robotics, software, and a line of the company’s Form 2 printers. Fun fact: Xconomy’s awards are the first products Formlabs has made for an outside group using Form Cell, says chief product officer Dávid Lakatos. (Formlabs printed the awards for us for free.)

We’ll share more next week from our behind-the-scenes look at Formlabs’ new system in action.