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Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

A good bow tie always makes a great conversation piece.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Early birds get the aisle seats.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston's Life Science Disruptors

Boston's Life Science Disruptors

Faces in the crowd.

photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Scott Manalis spoke about the challenges and promise of precision medicine in cancer, and some of the work he’s been doing at the Koch.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Bring some questions, you’ll always get a chance to speak.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Emulate president and CSO Geraldine Hamilton (left) holding up one of her startup’s “lung-on-a-chip” systems---about the size of a double-A battery---as scientific founder Don Ingber (right) gives some details about its development.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Best blazer in the house right here.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Terry McGuire (left) and Vicki Sato (right) convened a discussion on the gender gap in biotech boardrooms and executive suites. “Keep track” of how many women you’ve interviewed, hired, promoted, and what the salary discrepancies are between women and men, Sato said.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

A full house doling out some kudos.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Several attendees took part in our gender gap discussion, with many drawing on their own experiences and calling for solutions and creative ideas to address the problem.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Intellia Therapeutics CEO Nessan Bermingham (left) and Atlas Venture partner Jean-Francois Formela (right) had some fun heckling one another on stage.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

After leading a chat with Sato, McGuire chimed in from the crowd during a different discussion.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Formela had first talked with the backers of another gene editing company, CRISPR Therapeutics, before forming Intellia with Bermingham.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Post-event chatting.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Attendees filing out of the auditorium for some networking.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

And now for the fun part: free food and drinks.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Wine, beer, cheese and berries were on the menu this year.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Among the attendees is Chandra Ramanathan (right), the head of Bayer’s east coast innovation center.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

And Fulcrum Therapeutics CEO (and former Epizyme CEO) Bob Gould.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

One attendee showing one can network while balancing a plate of food on a full wine cup.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

Boston’s Life Science Disruptors

We’re glad all had a great time---see you next year.

Photos by Keith Spiro Photography

Xconomy Boston — 

How did one of the ambitious gene editing startups in biotech come together? What lessons does Harvard University professor and biotech veteran Vicki Sato have about closing the gender gap after spending “most of her career” as the only woman in the room? And what would it take to get organ systems on tiny microchips not just adopted by pharma, but approved by the FDA as a replacement for other preclinical drug testing methods?

These are just a few questions that our speakers answered last week at the latest installment of “Boston’s Life Science Disruptors” at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT. A packed house took part in interactive chats on three topics; you can get a little taste of the festivities in the slideshow above.

Thanks first to our attendees and our speakers: Koch biological and mechanical engineering professor Scott Manalis; Wyss Institute founding director Don Ingber; Emulate president and CSO Geraldine Hamilton; Harvard professor of management practice Vicki Sato; Polaris Partners founding partner Terry McGuire; Koch executive director Anne Deconinck; Intellia Therapeutics founder and CEO Nessan Bermingham; and Atlas Venture partner Jean-Francois Formela.

Thanks also to our event host the Koch Institute; and gold sponsors ALT and Bayer; silver sponsors The Richmond Group, Danforth Advisors, Sunstein Kann Murphy & Timbers LLP, and WuXi AppTec. Also a thank you to our event partners: the Association for Women in Science, and Massachusetts Life Sciences Center; our national partner Alexandria Real Estate Equities; and our charter underwriter Biogen.

And as always a tip of the cap to Keith Spiro of Keith Spiro Photography for the photos—hope you all enjoy them.