General disassembly

General disassembly

Loading in

Loading in

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

TVs by the ton

TVs by the ton

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Re-usable

Re-usable

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Up the belt

Up the belt

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Factory in reverse

Factory in reverse

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Harvesting value

Harvesting value

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Heat sinks

Heat sinks

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Circuit boards

Circuit boards

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Precious metals

Precious metals

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Into the shredder

Into the shredder

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

The shredder

The shredder

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Metal-laden dust

Metal-laden dust

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Mixed aluminum

Mixed aluminum

Photo by Benjamin Romano / Xconomy

Millions of people are today enjoying new electronic devices, becoming familiar with a tablet, phone, PC, or television that was waiting under the tree. But just as this year’s bounty displaces a generation of older devices, so too will these new toys eventually be made to seem obsolete. They will reside in a box in the garage for a while. Then one day, during spring cleaning perhaps, it will be time to go.

And then what happens?

Consumers have a number of options for unwanted electronics—particularly mobile devices that still have some residual value and can be re-sold. But recycling is typically the only choice for older, bulkier electronics such as TVs and computers. Packed with hazardous materials, most e-waste is no longer accepted at landfills. Recycling it is a complex process.

We recently visited Total Reclaim, a large electronics recycler in Seattle, to learn about the un-building of our gadgets. It’s the largest of eight processing facilities around the state that participates in E-Cycle Washington, a 5-year-old program that offers handling of obsolete devices, paid for by their manufacturers under a 2006 state law. The program has handled more than 200 million pounds of e-waste, diverting it from landfills and ensuring that it isn’t shipped overseas to places with lax environmental and safety standards.

Total Reclaim takes in more than 100,000 pounds of unwanted electronics each day, on average, from E-Cycle Washington and the company’s commercial customers. (In addition to e-waste, the company handles appliances and lighting.) This facility is just one of hundreds like it around the world. It provides a glimpse of the huge and growing volume of e-waste our modern lives throw off with each ever-shorter technology “upgrade” cycle.

That’s part of why Total Reclaim is in the midst of a multi-million dollar upgrade of its own to both enhance working conditions—including new break rooms, bright white walls, and LED lighting—and to add more machinery to do what humans do now, faster, says Craig Lorch, co-owner of the 23-year-old company.

Removing the plastic covers from fax machines and printers, for example, is now a brute-force job. “You literally have to have someone break the pieces off physically,” Lorch says.

Total Reclaim runs 18 hours a day during the work week, and 10 hours a day on weekends to keep up with the relentless incoming volume. It employs about 120 people in electronics recycling.

“We need to be mechanizing where we can to keep that number within control, and also making sure that the work that people do is quality work and it’s something that humans should be doing, rather than machines,” Lorch says over the cacophony of machines and men breaking apart other machines.

Total Reclaim is an electronics factory working in reverse.

From the semi-trailers backed against the loading dock, a forklift driver unloads pallet after pallet loaded with CPU towers, monitors, and televisions—both the old, bulky cathode-ray tube units and some of the newer, slender display panels. They rise in a small mountain.

On one side, men are sorting the old machines into batches, and loading them onto a conveyor that takes them up to a platform. (A small percentage of items deemed to have some residual value—often from corporate customers doing upgrades—is channeled to the re-use department, where it is tested, wiped of data, and reformatted. It often finds another life in hospitals in the developing world or for local nonprofit groups.)

The quiet of the re-use department is a stark contrast to the clash and … Next Page »

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The Author

Benjamin Romano is editor of Xconomy Seattle. Email him at bromano [at] xconomy.com.

  • http://www.kendall-press.com/ Kendall Press

    Ben, thanks for the tour of the recycling process. Up until now, the only images we’ve ever seen tend to be the toxic pits of dis assembly in third world places without regard to environmental concerns. Really glad to see recycling in the USA making re-use of as much as possible.

  • Kevin

    2 questions:

    1. Are there any plans to franchise this type of operation nationwide?

    2. if not what other companies do you know doing this type of work?

  • http://itamg.com/ Richar Charlee

    Hello Benjamin. This is too good acknowledgment about electronic recycling procedure and how the companies most of e-waste recycling companies work. E-waste disposal is necessary for us to maintain balance in environment. I am glad to read this epic post.