Under the Radar Deals: 12 Northwest Financings You Haven’t Heard About

11/20/09Follow @gthuang

We hope to make this a regular feature in our Xconomy cities. It’s a look at small financings of private companies in tech, life sciences, and cleantech. These are deals in the roughly $100,000 to $1 million range, and they’re increasingly where the action is for local entrepreneurs, yet they’re often harder to track than the bigger deals we tend to report on.

And there were at least 12 of these smaller financings in the Northwest in October (see table below), according to ChubbyBrain, a New York-based information services company tracking VC, angel, and other investments in private companies. ChubbyBrain gets its data from regulatory filings, user submissions, and other sources, and this is the second monthly installment of “under the radar” deals in the Seattle area (you can see the previous deals for September here). The data didn’t include the investors or the stage of financing.

A few quick observations: Like the previous month, most of the financings were in Washington (7 out of 12), but a significant number (5) were in Oregon. Most were equity deals (7), with the rest (5) being debt financings. The majority of financings (9) were in software, Internet, or tech, while a much smaller number (3) were in life sciences and healthcare, and no cleantech or energy deals made the list.

If nothing else, these lists are a cool way to hear about emerging startups we otherwise wouldn’t know about. For example, I’ve heard of Teranode, Nearlyweds, and 1000Museums before, but Zapproved and Intellisist are completely new to me.

Here are the 12 “under the radar” deals from last month:

Teranode (Seattle) Lab automation software Debt, $900,000
Zapproved (Portland, OR) Online tools for business accountability and decision making Equity, $787,964

Intellisist (Bellevue, WA)

Speech recognition and customer service

Equity, $750,000

Artielle ImmunoTherapeutics (Tigard, OR)

Drugs to treat autoimmune diseases

Debt, $709,828

Lightspeed Technologies (Tualatin, OR)

Audio systems for classrooms

Debt, $430,000

1000Museums (Bellevue, WA)

Archival prints from art museums

Equity, $265,940

Insignia Health (Portland, OR)

Healthcare self-management

Equity, $250,000

Nearlyweds (Seattle)

Social software and wedding websites

Equity, $150,000

Innovega (Hansville, WA)

Engineering services Debt, $150,000

Eleven Wireless (Portland, OR)

Software and IT services for hotels

Equity, $125,000

Caleco Pharma (Bellingham, WA)

Healthcare, nutrition, and cosmetics

Equity, $105,000

Pa-Go Mobile (Seattle)

No description available (presumably mobile)

Debt, $98,000

Gregory T. Huang is Xconomy's Deputy Editor, National IT Editor, and the Editor of Xconomy Boston. You can e-mail him at gthuang@xconomy.com. Follow @gthuang

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  • http://www.pricingwire.com Chris Hopf

    Thanks for the insight Gregory.

    It will be interesting to see how each of them approach value messaging with respect to their competitive advantages, value propositions and pricing.

    Also will be interesting to see how ChubbyBrain’s “Karma Model” works out for them.

    Thanks again,

    Chris Hopf
    http://www.pricingwire.com
    Twitter: http://twitter.com/pricing

  • http://www.enterpriseseattle.org Bruce Jackson

    This is a great idea. You ought to talk to the guys at Kineta. They may or may not want to reveal fundraising numbers but I think it is important to communiate to the little guys that small financings are possible if the technology makes sense and they are willing to get funding for one milestone at a time.

    Bruce

  • http://www.xconomy.com/author/ltimmerman/ Luke Timmerman

    Bruce–I had a recent story on how Kineta secured a little more half of a 5-year, $13 million NIH grant it is splitting with a couple researchers at UW. They haven’t said as much publicly about their sources of private financing, but this is definitely an example of the kind of “non-dilutive” financing that companies are being told they’ve got to find to stay afloat at a time when venture capital is harder to come by. Here’s the link to the story. http://bit.ly/1YRVr2