The Icos Alumni: Where Are They Now?

11/18/09Follow @xconomy

(Page 5 of 9)

Dan Herendeen, research scientist, Tumor Vaccine Group, University of Washington

Carmen Hertel, research associate, Unigen

Jeff Hesselberg, vice president of regulatory affairs, GTx

John Hill, director of medical sciences, Amgen

Mark Hill, senior scientist in autoimmunity, ZymoGenetics

Stephen Hill, executive director of manufacturing, Amgen

Jim Hnilo, project manager, Ricerca Biosciences [Added: 10:10 am, 6/11/10]

Nicole Hoagland, clinical study manager, Seattle Children’s Hospital

Merl Hoekstra, vice president of corporate and business development, ELITech Group

Patricia Hoffman, administrative director for research, Puget Sound Blood Center

Ryan Holcomb, project director, Myriad Pharmaceuticals

Mark Honda, director of human resources, CMC Icos

Shawn Hooper, sales manager, Charles River Laboratories

Monique Howard, senior associate scientist, Amgen

Yvonne Howard, purchasing agent, Boeing

Scott Hussell, senior research associate, Novo Nordisk

Sally Thompson Iritani, associate director, ZymoGenetics

Christopher Irons, contract biotech drug researcher

Irina Jacobson, associate director of research chemistry, AVI Biopharma

Laury Jenkins, executive assistant, CMC Icos

Bohan Stan Jin, scientist II, Takeda San Diego

Bryan Jones, biotech and pharmaceutical consultant

Padmaja Juwadi, director of quality assurance, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories [Added at 5:30 Pacific, 3/10/10]

Suzanne Kanaly, scientific director, pathology, Allergan

Ramesh Kasar, scientist

Adam Kashishian, staff scientist at Calistoga Pharmaceuticals

Heather Kean, administrative assistant, Seattle Genetics

Kathy Keegan, principal scientist, Amgen

Gary Keizur, director of quality assurance/quality control, MediQuest Therapeutics

Michael Kellogg, associate director of facilities and operations, Trubion Pharmaceuticals

Ed Kesicki, director of small molecule drug discovery, Infectious Disease Research Institute

Pat Kilgannon, former director of project management, ZymoGenetics

Musong Kim, research scientist, Gilead Sciences

Jonathan Klepinger, senior research associate, Trubion Pharmaceuticals … Next Page »

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  • http://www.northcoastbio.com Johnny T. Stine

    I actually loved our logo – very simple, but it just looked like fun.
    When George R. was recently asked by a reporter from an Everett newspaper about building Icos into a company like Amgen….he replied “…..why would I stop there?”. With a leader like that, like George, one who inspires with energetic goals such as that mentioned – we could’ve done it. We had the tools and the ability to do just that. We had great people who’ve all proven themselves in places before and afterward…….but imagine what we could’ve done behind the hopes of a great leader like George who set that tone….a CEO who knew all of our names, someone who would talk to you like you were a valued asset, a guy that empowered us via ownership. Imagine what we could’ve done…..because that’s all we’re left to do.

    By the way- Luke – I prefer Icosanoids – a play on the word eicosanoid since we were primarily an inflammation company. :-)

  • http://www.xconomy.com/author/ltimmerman/ Luke Timmerman

    Johnny—Unfortunately, I never really got to know George very well because he had already left Icos by the time I started covering the company in 2001. But I made a point of meeting him at his home once a couple years ago when I was based in San Francisco. He wasn’t in great health, but he was still sharp and very much curious about the latest happenings in biotech.

    I haven’t heard the term Icosanoids from eicosanoid, but that made me laugh this morning. It sounds like something from Star Trek. Anybody know if this was also the inspiration for the term “Immunoids” for people who used to work at Immunex?

  • http://www.BiotechStockResearch.com David Miller

    Nice work, Luke. Goes to prove that even though we might lose companies through acquisition we’d really rather keep, it’s not like everything connected with the company disappears. By my eye, the “loss” of Icos created at least a half-dozen new companies and significantly strengthened a dozen or more startups. A nice silver lining.

  • Abby Kliphardt

    Nice article…good to see where my co-workers have ended. I loved my time at ICOS and will always lament the loss of a great company that was a real family….

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