Puget Sound Energy Buys Wind Turbines, Voyager Backs Video Ads, 10 Reasons Why Startups Fail, & More Seattle-Area Deals News

11/12/08Follow @gthuang

It was a pretty slow week for tech deals in the Northwest—chalk it up to the election and the Veteran’s Day holiday. Nevertheless, there was a trickle of activity in software, digital media, and energy.

—Seattle-based Voyager Capital has led an investment in Keystream, a Mountain View, CA-based online video advertising startup. The deal closed earlier this year, and the financial terms were not announced. Keystream’s software allows Web publishers to insert ads into blank spaces in their video content.

—Entrance Controls, a Tukwila, WA-based security company, acquired Portland, OR-based 1Pointe, a startup that delivers secure networking, storage, and wireless technologies to businesses. The terms of the deal were not disclosed.

—Puget Sound Energy, the Bellevue, WA-based utility company, purchased 22 wind turbine generators from Vestas, a leading turbine manufacturer with U.S. headquarters in Portland, OR. The turbines will be used to expand the Wild Horse Wind and Solar Facility in eastern Kittitas County, WA, and they make up most of the project’s $100 million budget.

—Apptio, a Bellevue, WA-based startup that helps companies manage and optimize their IT costs, signed up a new batch of customers, including Alaska Airlines, SkyTap, and SumTotal. A year ago, the company raised $7 million from Madrona Venture Group, Greylock Partners, Ignition Partners, and other investors.

—Not a deal, but a list of dealbreakers: Seattle angel investor Geoff Entress, formerly a venture partner at Madrona Venture Group, gave his Top 10 list of why startups fail. (The list goes to 11, like a Spinal Tap amp.)

—Also not a deal per se, but Luke reported on how Portland, OR-based Wellpartner, a mail-order pharmacy, is helping clinics that serve the poor gain access to drugs at half the average wholesale price that private insurers get charged. Wellpartner does it by cutting through the red tape of a federal program known as 340B.

Gregory T. Huang is Xconomy's Deputy Editor, National IT Editor, and the Editor of Xconomy Boston. You can e-mail him at gthuang@xconomy.com or call him at 617-252-7323. Follow @gthuang

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