Unbounded Robotic's UBR-1 Needs Some Coffee

Unbounded Robotic's UBR-1 Needs Some Coffee

Unbounded Robotics gave UBR-1 just a single arm because it realized that buyers of two-armed manipulator robots weren't actually using them for tasks that required two arms. Also, it helped to keep UBR-1's cost to a relatively low $35,000.

Photo courtesy of Unbounded Robotics

Unbounded Robotics' UBR-1

Unbounded Robotics' UBR-1

UBR-1 is designed to work alongside humans in places like factories, warehouses, supermarkets, and elder-care facilities. Along with its fancy arm—which can pan, pitch, roll, and grip—it’s got a full suite of imaging sensors and communications tools.

Photo courtesy of Unbounded Robotics

Suitable's Beam Pro in an Office Collaboration

Suitable's Beam Pro in an Office Collaboration

The Beam remote presence device, which supports Skype-style video conversations, is steered around an office environment by the worker who's "beaming" in from a remote location.

Photo courtesy of Suitable Technologies

Suitable's Beam in a Group Meeting

Suitable's Beam in a Group Meeting

Suitable doesn't describe Beam as a robot, since it doesn't navigate autonomously. But the company thinks it could change the way distributed organizations work, by allowing remote workers to have a day-long virtual presence.

Photo courtesy of Suitable Technologies

Suitable's Beam Pro

Suitable's Beam Pro

The Beam Pro costs about $16,000. Its smaller companion, the Beam+, will be available this summer for $2,000.

Photo courtesy of Suitable Technologies

Play-i's Bo Plays the Xylophone

Play-i's Bo Plays the Xylophone

Play-i's Bo and Yana robots are controlled using an accompanying iPad app. They're designed to teach kids basic programming concepts.

Photo courtesy of Play-i

Play-i's Bo Tows a Toy

Play-i's Bo Tows a Toy

Bo and Yana are designed for kids between 5 and 12 years old, who can follow tutorials and use a programming language called Scratch and a programming editor called Blockly to program the bots.

Photo courtesy of Play-i

Atlas in a Simulated City Environment

Atlas in a Simulated City Environment

Using Gazebo, a 3D simulator developed at the Open Source Robotics Foundation, teams entering the DARPA Robotics Challenge can test their designs in a virtual environment.

Image courtesy of Open Source Robotics Foundation

Robotic Ambulance Driver

Robotic Ambulance Driver

Here the simulated Atlas is in the starting pen for the DARPA Robotics Challenge, a multi-step competition in which a robot must drive a car and perform numerous other disaster-response tasks.

Image courtesy of Open Source Robotics Foundation

Atlas inside OSRF's DRC Simulator

Atlas inside OSRF's DRC Simulator

One of the tasks in the DARPA Robotics Challenge is turning a valve to close a pipe.

Image courtesy of Open Source Robotics Foundation

Origami Robotics' Romibo

Origami Robotics' Romibo

Romibo is a "lovable teaching assistant" designed to help autistic children communicate with caregivers and friends.

Image courtesy of Origami Robotics

Romibo in the Romper Room

Romibo in the Romper Room

The $995 robot can speak, gesture, follow a child's eye movements, and move around on a surface.

Image courtesy of Origami Robotics

iRobot's Ava 500

iRobot's Ava 500

Ava 500 is a video collaboration robot designed to help remote workers connect face-to-face with colleagues in other locations.

Photo courtesy of iRobot

iRobot's PackBot 510

iRobot's PackBot 510

The 510 Packbot, shown here with an EOD (explosive ordinance disposal) attachment, is designed for bomb disposal and other dangerous missions.

Photo courtesy of iRobot

iRobot's 110 FirstLook

iRobot's 110 FirstLook

IRobot describes FirstLook as "a small, light, throwable robot that provides hasty situational awareness" for military or law-enforcement personnel.

Photo courtesy of iRobot

If you’ve already bought your ticket for Xconomy’s Robo Madness half-day forum this Thursday, April 10, then you’ll enjoy a little appetizer, in the form of this slide show highlighting six of the participating organizations:

If you haven’t bought your ticket for Robo Madness—well, what are you waiting for? Get one now while we still have some left.

Here’s the full agenda for the event, which will be held at SRI International as part of National Robotics Week.

Wade Roush is a contributing editor at Xconomy.