Meet Iris and Scout

Meet Iris and Scout

San Francisco-based Bot & Dolly sells robot arms -- and the software that drives them -- to the entertainment industry. The arms, which come in two sizes, can guide a movie camera along a complex path in 3D space, capturing shots beyond the capabilities of any human camera operator. Bot & Dolly CEO Jeff Linnell will be one of the speakers at Xconomy's "Robots Remake the Workplace" event on April 11 in Menlo Park, CA.

Photo courtesy of Bot & Dolly

Bringing New Meaning to Android

Bringing New Meaning to Android

Bot & Dolly's robots don't just help to capture films -- sometimes they star in them. For an ad about Samsung's Nexus S Android phone, Bot & Dolly was commissioned to make a video showing a complex dance between four Iris robot arms.

Photo courtesy of Bot & Dolly

Romo Isn't As Confused As He Looks

Romo Isn't As Confused As He Looks

Romo is a remote-controlled mobile base with an iPhone for brains. It's made by Las Vegas-based Romotive, whose CEO Keller Rinaudo will join us on April 11. Why would you want to turn your iPhone into a robot? For play, for work, for education...or maybe for entertaining your cat.

Photo courtesy of Romotive

Romo Meets Kid

Romo Meets Kid

The software that comes with the $150 Romo base includes games like Romo Doodle, which allows users to control the platform's movement by drawing on the screen of a controller device (that is, another iPhone).

Photo courtesy of Romotive

Solar Droid

Solar Droid

The founding team of Menlo Park, CA-based Qbotix poses with one of the robots from its Qbotix Tracking System (QTS), which is designed to lower the cost of large solar installations. Founder and CEO Wasiq Bokhari (second from left) will represent Qbotix at Xconomy's April 11 forum.

Photo courtesy of Qbotix

A Monorail You Can't Ride

A Monorail You Can't Ride

The QTS robot travels on a looping rail through a forest of aimable solar panels. As it passes, the robot adjusts each panel's attitude so that it remains pointed directly at the sun. According to the company, one robot can replace hundreds of individual motors and controllers used in conventional solar tracking systems.

Photo courtesy of Qbotix

A Hair-Raising Feat of Robotic Engineering

A Hair-Raising Feat of Robotic Engineering

Restoration Robotics' Artas robot automates the delicate and demanding process of harvesting live follicles for hair restoration. At our event, CEO Jim McCollum will explain how it works.

Image courtesy of Restoration Robotics

Finding Follicles

Finding Follicles

Using digital imaging, the Artas system locates follicles from healthy areas of the scalp and dissects them in a minimally invasive way. This prevents damage and raises the odds that the follicles will thrive upon reimplantation.

Image courtesy of Restoration Robotics

Never Miss Another Meeting

Never Miss Another Meeting

"Wheels for your iPad" is how Double Robotics describes its telepresence technology. The two-wheeled system allows a remote worker to steer an iPad around an office environment and communicate with coworkers through interactive video calls. Double Robotics founder David Cann will be on hand to talk about the technology.

Photo courtesy of Double Robotics

Seeing Eye to Eye

Seeing Eye to Eye

The motorized stem of the "Double" lets the remote user adjust the height of the screen and camera to meet people at eye level. The system is self-balancing, but a kickstand can be deployed to save energy.

Image courtesy of Double Robotics

Telemedicine Arrives

Telemedicine Arrives

Physicians use the RP-VITA robot, developed by InTouch Health and iRobot, to consult with patients and other medical staff remotely. InTouch Health CEO Yulun Wang and iRobot CEO Colin Angle will join us April 11 for a live demonstration of the robot.

Image courtesy of InTouch Health

Bedside Manner

Bedside Manner

Medical staff can direct RP-VITA to a patient's bedside using an iPad app. There, the robot collects patient data and transmits it to off-site doctors or specialists, while also serving as a conduit for two-way video conversations. InTouch Health argues that RP-VITA can help hospitals catch medical emergencies sooner, lower error rates, and increase revenue.

Photo courtesy of InTouch Health

Kubi at Work

Kubi at Work

The Kubi robotic tablet stand from Revolve Robotics lets the user on the other end of a video conversation control the direction the device is facing. Marcus Rosenthal, the co-founder and CEO of Revolve, will describe the company's vision in a panel on telepresence robots on April 11.

Photo courtesy of Revolve Robotics

A Seat at the Table

A Seat at the Table

The Kubi's spring-loaded arms accommodate any tablet, such as an iPad, iPad Mini, or Microsoft Surface device. The caller steers the device via the Internet using controls on their screen.

Photo courtesy of Revolve Robotics

Home Away from Home

Home Away from Home

Revolve Robotics says the $229 Kubi lets users "keep in touch with family with a more natural connection."

Photo courtesy of Revolve Robotics

Meet Baxter

Meet Baxter

Baxter, an "adaptive" manufacturing robot, is the flagship product from Rethink Robotics. Rather than having to program Baxter's movements using complex software, users train the bot by manually moving its arms through a required motion, such as a pick-and-place operation. Rethink founder and chief technology officer Rod Brooks will be one of our keynote speakers on April 11.

Photo courtesy of Rethink Robotics

Pick and Place

Pick and Place

Rethink says Baxter is skilled at tasks like materials handling, loading, unloading, packing, unpacking inspecting, testing, sorting, grinding, polishing, and light assembly.

Photo courtesy of Rethink Robotics

We’re coming up fast on Xconomy’s second annual Silicon Valley robotics event, Robots Remake the Workplace, where we’ll bring together founders and CEOs of some of the country’s most innovative and interesting robotics companies.

To give you a preview of the April 11 event, which is part of National Robotics Week, we’ve assembled photos above from nine of the robotics companies whose leaders will be presenting. That includes Bot & Dolly, Double Robotics, InTouch Health, iRobot, Qbotix, Restoration Robotics, Rethink RoboticsRevolve Robotics, and Romotive.

Collectively, these companies are building robots that could disrupt everything from healthcare to office life to Hollywood movie-making. Some of their bots might fill jobs once performed by people; others could help create new jobs where none existed before. We’ve designed the event so that the jobs question—the focus of so many panicked media reports of late—will be front and center.

At the same time, you’ll get a thorough update about progress in robotics for areas like agriculture, energy management, manufacturing, and telepresence—and we’ll take you inside the heads of two prominent Silicon Valley investors, Steve Jurvetson and Ajay Agarwal, who see a future thickly populated by robots.

Rounding out the list of firms and organizations sending executives to the event are Aethon, Bain Capital Ventures, Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Harvest Automation, Redwood Robotics, Singularity University, SRI International (our host for the event), and 3D Robotics.

So get your tickets now, before the bots beat you to it.

Wade Roush is a contributing editor at Xconomy.