Thursday Deals Roundup: Zagat, Platfora, Lending Club & More

9/8/11Follow @wroush

Time for our more-or-less daily summary of key deals news in the Bay Area biztech world.

Google announced that it has acquired Zagat, the venerable and popular crowdsourced restaurant guide. Marissa Mayer, Google’s vice president for local, maps, and location services, said the Zagat operation “will be a cornerstone of our local offering—delighting people with their impressive array of reviews, ratings and insights, while enabling people everywhere to find extraordinary (and ordinary) experiences around the corner and around the world.” Financial terms weren’t disclosed.

—Platfora, a Palo Alto startup building a business intelligence and analytics software for data stored in the open-source Hadoop data warehousing system, announced that it has secured $5.7 million in Series A funding from Andreessen Horowitz and In-Q-Tel, the investing wing of the U.S. intelligence community.

—San Francisco-based Lending Club said that it has brought in strategic investments from Peter J. Thomson, the chairman of Thomvest and director of Thomson Reuters. Thomson has put an unspecified amount into Lending Club directly, and has also invested in the Conservative Consumer Credit Fund, which invests in consumer loans originated by Lending Club. Lending Club raised $25 million in a funding round last month led by Union Square Ventures.

—Powergetics, a San Francisco stealth-mode startup working on energy storage systems, has raised $10.3 million in a round of equity-based financing that could top out at $14.3 million, according to a regulatory filing.

—Redwood City, CA-based Striiv, which is developing a keychain fitness device that measures physical exertion, has closed a $6 million Series A funding round, first disclosed in an August regulatory filing. Backers included iD Ventures and individual investors Colin Angle of iRobot and Dado Banatao of Tallwood Ventures.

—In other news, the CrunchFund saga continues, with Fortune’s Dan Primack now reporting that TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington has been been really, truly terminated by his employer AOL.

Wade Roush is Xconomy's chief correspondent and editor of Xconomy San Francisco. You can subscribe to his Google Group or e-mail him at wroush@xconomy.com. Follow @wroush

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