Going Beyond Food 101

Going Beyond Food 101

Spoon University is an online resource, aimed at the college audience, for discussing local eateries, recipes, and . . . recovering from hangovers, said CEO Mackenzie Barth.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Printing Circuits on Anything

Printing Circuits on Anything

Cartesian's CEO Ariel Briner said his team developed a desktop 3D printer for producing circuit boards.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Faster Electronics Prototyping

Faster Electronics Prototyping

Argentum, from Cartesian, can make it easier to turn a new circuit from a design to a prototype.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Circuitry On Paper

Circuitry On Paper

Cartesian's printer can produce circuit boards on a variety of materials, including linen paper.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Internet That Doesn't Suck

Internet That Doesn't Suck

Claiming it can provide better service to businesses than the incumbents, Pilot offers month-to-month plans for its fiber-optic Internet service, said CEO Joseph Fasone.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Doing More with 3D

Doing More with 3D

Shane Scranton, CEO, said irisVR developed software for sharing and editing 3D models in virtual reality.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

A Different Kind of Information Flow

A Different Kind of Information Flow

Stream's CEO Thierry Schellenbach said his startup lets users quickly create scalable activity streams and newsfeeds.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Mobile-First Face for Restaurants

Mobile-First Face for Restaurants

Bentobox's platform helps restaurants manage their mobile websites and marketing, said CEO Krystle Mobayeni.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Making Music and Finding Work

Making Music and Finding Work

Unique Sound lets composers put samples of their work online to market their talents for potential jobs, said CEO Romain Cochet.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Back on Stage with Data Science

Back on Stage with Data Science

After a warm-up round at the New York Tech Meetup, DataCamp CEO Jonathan Cornelissen returned to talk about his platform for offering online data science education.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

What's in Stefan's Head?

What's in Stefan's Head?

Stefan's Head CEO Sathish Naadimuthu said his startup helps retail brands reach consumers more effectively via text messages.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

A Rosetta Stone for Websites

A Rosetta Stone for Websites

Localize CEO Brandon Paton said his team developed a way to translate content on websites into different languages with one line of code.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Getting a Handle on Node.JS apps

Getting a Handle on Node.JS apps

Keymetrics is a way to manage and monitor apps created in Node.JS, said CEO Alexandre Strzelewicz.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Brad Feld, a Techstars co-founder, did not mince words when he grabbed the microphone at demo day.

“I think this Techstars class is the most technically deep Techstars class that I’ve seen,” he said. “It’s pretty incredible to see it here in New York City.”

That was his assessment of the winter 2015 class of Techstars NYC last week at NYU’s Skirball Center. The twelve startups that graduated include online data science school DataCamp and Cartesian, which developed a desktop 3D printer for circuit boards. (See slideshow.) LSQ, whose platform is used to develop software applications that can each run multiple “microservices”, did not demo on stage and is not pictured.

It was perhaps fitting that the demo day was held on the same stage where the monthly New York Tech Meetup takes place, which also included DataCamp in its last outing.

New York does see a large share of consumer and media-driven startups. However, that does not mean the city is devoid of what some might call “real” technology. Feld said when he and his Techstars co-founders—David Cohen, Jared Polis, and David Brown—expanded to New York in 2011, they got a bit of guff from others about what the city had to offer.

Brad Feld said New York shows its strength in technology with this latest class.

Brad Feld said New York shows its strength in technology with this latest class.

“The first couple of years in New York, I heard over and over again from people around the country that the companies in New York were lightweight,” he said.

The popular notion, Feld said, centered on Silicon Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area as the only places to get really deep in technology.

“I’ve been calling bullshit on that since 2011,” he said.

Given Etsy’s huge IPO the day before demo day, the local innovation scene seems to be cementing its legitimacy, by Feld’s reckoning. “It’s another step along the way to seeing the New York startup community really blossom,” he said.