Water-Resistant Tablets, Surgical Robots, and Curved TVs Come to NY

Getting Drenched

Getting Drenched

Sony’s Xperia Tablet Z, built with Gorilla Glass and sealed tight, can endure 30 minutes of immersion underwater. Taken at Engadget Expand.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

And Still Working

And Still Working

According to Sony, the Xperia Tablet Z is just 6.9 mm in depth, slimmer than the iPad Air by 0.3 mm.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

New Learning Curve for TV

New Learning Curve for TV

This 55-inch, LG OLED television has a subtle, concave shape intended to to eliminate visual distortion. Regardless of where the viewer sits, the picture should be on point--- with the spectacle of Ultra HD.

The screen, comprised of OLEDs that allow for the new shape, has a wickedly thin 4mm bezel. Taken at CES Unveiled.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Speed Meets Software

Speed Meets Software

The folks from Chevrolet brought some eye candy to Engadget Expand: the 2014 Corvette Stingray.

Why is a sports coupe at a tech show? Probably because it is equipped with MyLink, as are other cars from Chevrolet. MyLink is a voice and touch screen system that controls info, apps, and entertainment in the vehicle.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Delicate Touch

Delicate Touch

Can robots have a gentle bedside manner? Perhaps through the surgeons at the controls. The da Vinci Surgical System, from Intuitive Surgical, can remotely perform intricate procedures. Taken at Engadget Expand.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

With Surgical Precision

With Surgical Precision

The demo stirred memories of the medical bot in "Empire Strikes Back" connecting a new hand to Luke Skywalker.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Making Touch Screens Hands-Free

Making Touch Screens Hands-Free

Eye-tracking technology from Tobii lets people control tablets with just a look.

A Windows 8 Pro tablet is mounted onto the EyeMobile component, which lets individuals with physical impairments open apps, access the Web, and more. Taken at CES Unveiled.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Formlabs Refining Its Machine

Formlabs Refining Its Machine

The Form 1 desktop 3D printer has yet to be released publicly. That does not keep it from cranking out detailed objects. Taken at Engadget Expand, though Formlabs also appeared at CES Unveiled.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Putting the Pieces Together

Putting the Pieces Together

Though legal issues persist with 3D Systems regarding patents, Formlabs was eager to show off the intricate pieces its desktop 3D printer can produce.

photo by João-Pierre S. Ruth

Tech shows at the tail end of the year always bring a flurry of slick devices.

During the past few weeks, I have bounced from event to event in New York, snapping photos of the latest wares to hit the electronics scene. Some gadget makers hope these shows will boost their holiday sales. Others tease products they plan to release in the new year.

Between this month’s Engadget Expand NY and CES Unveiled NY, it is easy to trip over the gadgets competing for the spotlight. On Thursday, Pepcom will host yet another tech demo show in New York for the media and analysts.

Getting the word out about devices seems to be more critical this winter. The consumer electronics industry not only must ride the ebb and flow of the economy, but also appeal to customers’ desires, which can be tricky. How many different devices does one person need and how often, realistically, will they  upgrade to new products?

Cars equipped with the MyLink “infotainment” system are not all that new but curved OLED televisions are making ripples in the electronics scene.

The above gallery barely skims the devices—big and small—on display at some of the events in New York. More gadgets will surely bombard the senses at shows in the days to come. And International CES, the big daddy of gadget events, is less than two months away in Las Vegas.

The Author

João-Pierre S. Ruth is the editor of Xconomy New York. He can be reached at jpruth@xconomy.com and followed on Twitter @jpruth.