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Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Brian Cusack from Google welcomed the crowd and set the tone for the afternoon.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

We had a series of interactive talks and chats covering personal genomics, high-tech therapies, healthcare devices, and wearables.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Third Rock Ventures' Alexis Borisy (left) chatted with Harvard Medical School's George Church about what to do with all of our genetic information.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

A good time was had by all. Especially if you weren't up there emceeing and moderating.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Dana Callow from Boston Millennia Partners (left) and Jon Flint from Polaris Partners talked about what excites them in their health-related investments.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Anita Goel from Nanobiosym gave her perspective on the future of portable diagnostic devices.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Audience questions are a key part of our events; we want to hear from you.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Speakers mingled with attendees, and lots of new connections were formed.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Asking Eric Elenko from PureTech Ventures and Akili Interactive Labs (right) how videogames could make us smarter (or slow down cognitive decline).

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Joe Concra, Denise Orzo, and Kevin Paulsen tuned in from O+ (a festival of art, music, and wellness).

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Right to left: Ben Schlatka (MC10), Rony Sellam (Segterra), and Anita Goel (Nanobiosym) chat with Xconomy's Curt Woodward about health devices and personal analytics.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Our audience had all sorts of interesting discussions about the future of personal health and wellness.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

InsideTracker's health software says you should drink more red wine. So drink up.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Neumitra's Robert Goldberg (left) chatted with attendees about wearable sensors and health analytics.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

So, should we go get our genomes sequenced or what?

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Wouldn't these guys look better in Google Glass? No.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Ben Rubin from Revv (center) makes a point about the wellness market, while Robert Goldberg (Neumitra) and I look on.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Neumitra's wrist sensor tracks a person's stress and anxiety level; that information could be useful for clinicians, consumers, and companies.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

Personal genomics pioneer George Church said it's "one of the greatest paradoxes" that people aren't making use of their genetic information yet. But they will. "We can change our destiny," he said.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare Gets Personal

Healthcare Gets Personal

This Google spread may have changed some people's dinner destinies at least.

KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess

Healthcare is a strange thing. We all need it, but we don’t necessarily do what’s in our best interest.

Take genetic information. Sequencing technology is reaching a price point where many people could afford to learn a lot more about themselves—their risks, predispositions, and so forth. Yet most aren’t touching it, at least not yet. That “paradox” was one of the topics of a keynote chat between Harvard geneticist George Church and Third Rock Ventures VC and entrepreneur Alexis Borisy, at our “Healthcare Gets Personal” event at Google last Thursday.

One conclusion: it’s important to figure out what you can (and will) do with genetic information, as well as what probably can’t be changed. And how to share all that information for broader health reasons, when the time comes—plus all the regulatory issues around that. But “we can change our genetics now,” Church said. “We can change our destiny.”

Personal genomics and analytics were just one piece of a very entertaining afternoon—we also heard about health tracking, diagnostics, wearables, behavior change, and even videogames that might be prescribed for brain therapy.

Big thanks to Brian Cusack and Google for hosting the event, and to Comcast Business for sponsoring it. And, of course, thanks to all of our speakers and attendees for making the event fun and successful.

Special thanks to Keith Spiro for the pictures, which you can check out in the slideshow above. (See more of his work at KeithSpiroPhoto courtesy of Kendall PRess.)

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  • Nathaniel Welch

    Excellent gathering and lots of really fascinating technologies for personal health.
    George Church was a great opening speaker for this topic and he did a nice job of framing some of the hard choices on the ways we can use these technologies that we will have to decide as a society – should we program the genes our children have.
    After hearing the CEOs/founders describe all the different disruptive products/services, I walked away realizing that the current healthcare infrastructure and clinicians are woefully unprepared to deal with the explosion in these kinds of technologies. Having said that, I think that there are many people in healthcare who will welcome the push that these new technologies will exert on the provision of care.